So, on the second straight Friday of the computers in my office going haywire – it is time for a blog post! Today’s topic – disturbing in the news!

The most disturbing news item I can think of should, by all rights, be the story of an actor actually slitting his throat onstage with what he thought was a prop knife during a performance of Mary Stuart in Vienna.

Unfortunately, because of what society has become in the twenty-first century, that horror is eclipsed in my mind by the results of a recent survey from the UK. According to a recent hyper-unscientific survey conducted by thebabywebsite.com, the site’s mostly British readers can’t remember the words to classic lullabies. That, in itself is hardly distressing – after all, I can barely remember what I ate for breakfast this morning.

What is upsetting, as reported by Jezebel and the Motherlode blog at the Times (and a bunch of Brit papers), is what they are doing instead. For reasons that are completely mysterious to me, parents, who presumably smoked so much weed in college that “rock-a-bye-baby” presents an insurmountable challenge, have rated Katy Perry’s “I Kissed a Girl” as the third most popular song to sing as they lull little baby Billy to sleep.

I can hypothetically understand the hypothetically addictive appeal of the ridiculously danceable song to people who should really be bemoaning it as a cheap commercial trick that exploits the legitimate sexual experiences of a considerable segment of the population (I may or may not hypothetically have it on my iPod and dance around my kitchen singing along to it when no one is home). But even with my shameful appreciation of the song, I fail to see how it makes the top three in newly minted lullabies!

The Times blog, trying to class up the story and prove how sophisticated fancy New Yorkers are, refers to her as “Kate Perry” and then asks readers to share their own bedtime traditions. Naturally favorites like the Beatles and Peter, Paul & Mary come up but so do Bob Marley, Rihanna and NeYo. You’ve come a long way (from Baby Mozart), baby!